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Victoria, BCVictoria Ship Yards

Shelter Modular completed this impressive, 18,000 square foot, permanent office complex for Victoria Shipyards. This new office building was designed to house 3 separate tenants as part of a new program with the Canadian Department of National Defense.

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Commercial

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Vision NDE

LocationNisku, ABProject TypeCommercialClientVision NDE

2 Storey Office Complex

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2 Storey Office Complex

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Surrey Truck Stop

LocationSurrey, BCProject TypeCommercialClientClient Hall Constructors

Washcar

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Washcar

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Control Building, Suncor (TWD Technologies)

LocationPort Moody, BCProject TypeCommercialClientSuncor (TWD Technologies)

In progress

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In progress

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Pajos Fish & Chips

LocationWhiterock, BCProject TypeCommercialClientHall Constructor, End User Pajos Fish & ChipsWebsitewww.pajos.com

In progress

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Shelter unveils Victoria Shipyards Office Complex

Project Length12 weeksLocationVictoria, BCProject TypeCommercialClientVictoria Shipyards Office Complex

Shelter just completed an impressive, 18,000 square foot, permanent office complex for Victoria Shipyards. This new office building was designed to house 3 separate…

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Shelter just completed an impressive, 18,000 square foot, permanent office complex for Victoria Shipyards. This new office building was designed to house 3 separate tenants as part of a new program with the Canadian Department of National Defense.

This $3 million, 2-storey project features an elevator, a large glass and aluminum storefront entrance and luxurious marble flooring. With a spacious lobby and wide hallways, you would not get the impression that these buildings were modular. Victoria Shipyards project manager, Peter Lutzmann says, “Everyone is happy with the design. We incorporated a number of features into the design, such as two-tone siding in the horizontal and the vertical, to make this project look like site-built.”

Victoria Shipyards decided to go with modular, mostly for the benefits of speed and flexibility. Victoria Shipyards project manager, Peter Lutzmann says, “With modular, I was able to start the underground work, such as line services and foundations, while the buildings were being constructed in the factory. Overall, we were able shave off 3 to 4 months from the construction schedule.”

Flexibility was also key. Even though the building is installed on permanent foundations, the fact that these buildings are modular opens the doors to opportunities to relocate or resell these buildings in future. That is a huge advantage.

“Modular is also a very cost-efficient solution,” says Victoria Shipyards project manager, Peter Lutzmann. “It enables you to really save time without compromising quality.”

Shelter project manager Chris Yamamoto adds, “Even considering the costs of shipping to Vancouver Island, the overall project cost was very competitive with standard site-built structures. And with creative, attractive designs, the final project can look as attractive as site-built.”

Victoria Shipyards project manager, Peter Lutzmann concludes, “I give Shelter high marks in customer service. I have nothing but good things to say about Shelter. I would use them again in a heartbeat!”

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Well-designed Church Redefines Modular Construction Paradigm

LocationLangley, BCProject TypeCommercialClientSt. Nicholas Parish Church

A new church designed and built by Shelter offers unique interior and exterior wood construction. St. Nicholas Parish recently constructed a Catholic…

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A new church designed and built by Shelter offers unique interior and exterior wood construction.

St. Nicholas Parish recently constructed a Catholic Church in a five-acre forested setting in the Walnut Grove section of Langley, BC. Parish leadership decided to preserve or utilize as much of the forest as possible. Using a portable saw mill, the large cedar, fir and hemlock trees located on part of the site were transformed into beams, columns, trusses and siding for the building. The alter cross is made from the first tree cut.

Barry Nickerson, Chair of the Building Committee, recalls, “We wanted to maintain the site’s natural condition as much as possible, and use the trees to blend the building into the site. It worked out very well.” The wood materials provide a “dramatic and beautiful effect.”

The Design/Build Advantage

Nickerson says that Shelter produced the church on a Design/Build basis — Shelter handled all the aspects of designing and constructing the building, from beginning to end, including all site work, connections and paving. “This streamlined the process, reduced waste and kept costs in line. We knew how much we could afford to spend. Shelter’s architect, who worked both for us and Shelter, designed to fit our budget. There were no cost overruns. In the end, we got tremendous value for our dollar with Design/Build.”

The 7,500 square-foot modular building was constructed in Shelter’s factory, with a central nave constructed on site because of height considerations. “We can hardly believe that it’s modular,” says Nickerson. “You wouldn’t know which sections are modular and which are site built.”

Modular Speed and Quality

The modular approach also offered speedier construction; the church had a brief time frame for completion. “There is a controlled construction environment in the factory,” Nickerson points out. “The quality is just superb. People are really pleased with the result.”

Jamie Cooke, project manager on Shelter’s Design/Build team, says that completing the building in the factory “cut our time dramatically and accelerated the target date. It was about three months to initial occupancy.”

Father Mark Hagemoen, Parish Pastor, confirms that the use of site timber was done in a “tasteful way” that is very positive from a “spirituality and faith perspective. We told Shelter what we wanted and what our budget was, and they came up with the best alternatives and the plans we liked the most.”

Functional and Cost-Effective

Designed to be multi-use and multi-functional the church provides space for teaching, social activities, meetings, a library and offices, as well as prayer and worship. A movable soundproof wall can be used to create a quiet area in the chapel. Parishioners “are very happy with the functional and cost-effective building.”

Architectural Design

“We collaborated with architect Christopher Vajda to come up with a design that really set us apart,” says Jamie Cook. “He has a good sense of scale in placing the building on a sloping site that fits into the neighborhood.” Shelter’s Vic Schneider added that Shelter handled consultants and licensing.

The project is the first phase, with other buildings to be added to the site in future.

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Sunnyhill Health Centre Acquires Modular Lab Complex

LocationVancouver, BCProject TypeCommercialClientSunnyhill Health Centre

Modular builder Shelter has supplied a 10,000 square foot, two-storey building complex for Sunnyhill Health Centre for Children in Vancouver, BC, that provides…

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Modular builder Shelter has supplied a 10,000 square foot, two-storey building complex for Sunnyhill Health Centre for Children in Vancouver, BC, that provides approximately 30 administrative and clinical offices.

The project was notable for a stringent requirement of extremely minimal vibration in a first-floor clinical lab area, called the Shriners Gait Lab. Six CCD video cameras are suspended on a frame running near the top of the wall. The cameras use reflected light to record a patient’s physical movement while walking across plates in the floor that record force. The tests are used for assessment and diagnosis of surgical procedures.

Shelter achieved the vibration isolation requirements through the separation of the Lab’s floor area from the surrounding building areas, and the use of vibration-isolating rubber gaskets.

“The cameras are subjected to diminished vibration, which is essential for our analyses in the lab,” comments Alec Black, Director of the Gait Lab.

The 20 modules comprising the building were constructed in Shelter’s factory and delivered to the building site, which greatly minimized noise, disruption and dust at the hospital. Craned into place on a perimeter concrete foundation over a two-day period, the complex is connected with an existing hospital building through an all-steel bridge constructed by Shelter.

The Project Coordinator for Sunnyhill Health Centre, Erica Guliker, salutes the “good quality of construction” and the shorter completion time compared with site-built. The design, says Guliker, represented a partnership between architect of record Matti Saar and in-house designers at Shelter. “I was pleased to work with Shelter — they really made it happen,” she says.

Matti Saar, of M. Saar Architecture in Vancouver, considers the Sunnyhill complex a “good example of a very successful modular building. The quality is better than stick-built because it was made in a factory and because the quality control is much more stringent.”

Saar maintains that pre-conceptions about modular have discouraged building owners from realizing that modular buildings generally offer higher quality, and are particularly suited to health and school facilities.

Shelter’s quality-control process took place under its ISO 9001 certification.

Educational

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3 classrooms, Sooke School District

LocationLangford, BCProject TypeEducationalClientSooke School District

In progress

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Modular learning environments for the 21st century

LocationLangley, BCProject TypeEducationalClientElm’s Academy

A revolutionary new learning space has been brought to Canada. Shelter Modular has just finished construction of the Peregrine House School in Langley--a…

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A revolutionary new learning space has been brought to Canada. Shelter Modular has just finished construction of the Peregrine House School in Langley--a 1,200-square-foot modular learning environment adapted from the original Perkins+Will Sprout Space™.

The Peregrine House School is the first of its kind in the country and one of a few select preschools that will strictly follow the A.M.I. Montessori International Pedagogy, with its authentic full complete set of Montessori material, and custom child-sized furniture.

The facility is a groundbreaking version of a modular classroom facility—one that can provide healthy, sustainable, and flexible spaces for students to learn. Designed with 21st century students and teachers in mind, the space encourages an open and engaging teaching environment, and its adaptability allows for various teaching methods and seating configurations.

The Peregrine House School is a game changer in Langley. The facility is continuous from interior to exterior, due in part to the large doors and clerestory windows that span the length of the building. It features environmentally friendly and technologically advanced building components, including a heat recovery ventilator to meet the highest indoor air quality standards, including those required by LEED. The school is a well-insulated wood structure with high-reflectance roofing, fabric ductwork, bio-based flooring, and ample natural light. Passive-house philosophy, including continuous building envelope, exceptional insulation properties and awareness of thermal bridging has been incorporated into this design. These all help reduce energy usage and minimize negative impacts on the environment, particularly during its construction.

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Learning Tree Daycare Demonstrates the Beauty of Modular

LocationVancouver, BCProject TypeEducationalClientBrant Villa Daycare SocietyBudget$1 millionArchitectGHM Architects – Mark Mathiasen

Shelter was the right choice for this site-sensitive building project for Brant Villa Daycare Society in Vancouver, BC. The Learning Tree Daycare project involved…

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Shelter was the right choice for this site-sensitive building project for Brant Villa Daycare Society in Vancouver, BC. The Learning Tree Daycare project involved demolishing and removing an existing building and installing a new and larger building complex, while paying careful attention not to damage a fruit tree that was a landmark to the site.

The Shelter team had to adjust timber piles and lay new reinforced concrete foundations for the new building design, while working within the confines of a tight and small Vancouver lot. Shelter provided all the site work and site services on this challenging turnkey project.

“We had confidence in Shelter to complete the project to a high quality standard and on time,” says Bob Brandle and Harald Yurk of the Learning Tree Day Care. “Shelter is a world-renowned modular building company, skilled in providing economical designs, with superior quality construction, all within reasonable time frames.”

The project also included a geothermal heating/cooling system and landscaping. The playground equipment, benches and other items were all made of custom hand-carved British Columbia wood. Special features of the project included peaked roofs, wood soffits, cork floors and hardiplank siding and trim.

Learning Tree Day Care project managers Bob Brandle and Harald Yurk add, “The final product is a first class 2,316 square foot modular complex, completed within budget (and at the lowest bid). We can highly recommend Shelter as a contractor for any similar project.”

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Full Day Kindergarten Classrooms — BC Ministry of Education

Project Length9 monthsLocationThroughout BC; 25 school districts; 100 sitesProject TypeEducationalClientBC Ministry of EducationBudget$30 million

As part of a $30-million contract with the Province of BC’s Ministry of Education, Shelter designed, built and installed 140 state-of-the-art, modular classrooms for…

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As part of a $30-million contract with the Province of BC’s Ministry of Education, Shelter designed, built and installed 140 state-of-the-art, modular classrooms for BC’s new full-day kindergarten program, which started September 2011.

These new classrooms are far from the typical school portable of yesteryear, which only had a 15-year lifespan. In fact, you really can’t compare them. “This is different,” said then BC Minister of Education Margaret MacDiarmid during a tour of the prototype January 2011 (who has since been replaced by George Abbott, who has also toured the plant). “You can just tell by the feel of it.” Designed to last up to 40 years, these structures, installed on permanent foundations, will provide the same feel and comfort as any site-built structure. Even those buildings that will be installed on temporary foundations will provide the warmth necessary to deal with a harsh winter in Northern BC and the comfort of air conditioning on a sweltering hot day in BC’s Okanagan.

Mary Polak, then Minister of Children and Family Development (now Minister for Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation) and current Langley MLA, also attended the tour of the prototype and agreed that these new buildings are the way of the future. She said, “You can’t even call these buildings a portable. They are so night and day different.”

“There is nothing like this anywhere else [in the province],” said MacDiarmid. Working closely with the Ministry and school district representatives, Shelter employed creative thinking and the most advanced technologies to produce a superior structure that sets a new benchmark for modular school construction in British Columbia.

The classrooms are more spacious, with large functional windows, durable window roll shutters, security screens, high performance warm insulation (outside the framing), an energy-efficient HVAC system, wood exterior and interior finishing, and the infrastructure for full building services and computer technology. It also meets the latest seismic safety standards. MacDiarmid said it’s a great space for younger students. “It’s airy. It’s bright. I love the windows and the natural light … the primary colours on the [ceiling] and … the cabinetry.”

“This is a great way to have gone,” said MacDiarmid. With enrolment growing in some areas and declining in others, modular classrooms provide the flexibility to be moved or clustered should enrolment forecasts change.

Minister Polak agreed, adding that modular buildings provide a ton of savings in time and labour. Buildings are constructed indoors, eliminating weather delays. Plus building construction can move ahead without waiting for foundations to be laid. This translates into a costs savings, which means more money can be put into the classroom.

MacDiarmid concluded, “Things have gone well. I can’t wait to see these classroom spaces filled with students.” In total, 25 school districts with about 100 sites across the province received the 140 modular classrooms.

“I am quite confident that [parents and educators] are going to be quite pleased to receive [these modular classrooms],” added Minister Polak. From the words of kindergarten students and their parents who also attended the tour, these new modular classrooms are destined to be a winner. “It looks like a real classroom,” said parent Tracey Munday. Parent Sheri Williams agreed, “They look pretty amazing.”

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Simon Fraser University chooses Shelter for quality modular

Location Metro Vancouver, BCProject TypeEducationalClientSimon Fraser UniversityArchitectB.Gordon Hlynsky Architects

Shelter recently completed a 10,837 square foot classroom and administration building for Simon Fraser University’s Foreign Exchange Student Program. Shelter was an…

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Shelter recently completed a 10,837 square foot classroom and administration building for Simon Fraser University’s Foreign Exchange Student Program. Shelter was an obvious choice for this project. SFU Development Manager, Erik Grafstorm says, “I had researched Shelter’s background and found their reputation to be very sound among past clients.”

This multi-unit, single-storey temporary structure was designed to service immediate needs of their ESL program, without making the commitment of building a permanent structure.

Designed with the building occupants in mind, this 5 classroom building features numerous skylights in the central hallways to maximize natural light and a roof-mount HVAC with heating/cooling system. Security was also an important aspect of this project. As such the building also features and intrusion alarm, high security door locks, and electronic card readers.

To match other buildings on the site, the building was designed with corrugated steel siding with a galvalume finish. Spacious decks, plus building skirting, stairs, and ramps were added for additional appeal and functionality.

SFU Development Manager, Erik Grafstorm says, “I have found Shelter to be a very accommodating contractor, working with the owner and consultants in a team spirit to overcome obstacles and help complete the project on time and within budget. Shelter appears to have a good understanding of a learning institution’s particular needs and works diligently to satisfy them. Construction problems were kept to a minimum and very few change orders were required.”

The project was unmitigated success. SFU Development Manager, Erik Grafstorm says, “After completing this project, I would add my recommendation and not hesitate to work with Shelter in the future.”

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Leed Silver Certified Classrooms — Alberta Ministry of Education

Location16 Alberta Schools in Calgary and EdmontonProject TypeEducationalClientBird Graham SchoolsBudget$28 million

Shelter and Greensmart Manufacturing (the Greensmart Shelters Group of Companies) has recently completed 192 double-wide modular classrooms for Alberta’s new LEED…

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Shelter and Greensmart Manufacturing (the Greensmart Shelters Group of Companies) has recently completed 192 double-wide modular classrooms for Alberta’s new LEED Silver Certified schools P3 project.

Bird Graham Schools (a joint venture between Bird Design-Build Limited and Graham Design Builders) had the 30-year contract for the design, construction, finance and maintenance of 16 schools in Calgary and Edmonton, and awarded the Greensmart Shelters Group with the modular portion of the project.

“We chose Greensmart Shelter because they had the knowledge, experience, and willingness to provide top quality product within very tight construction deadlines,” says Ian Boyd, Project Director at Bird-Graham Schools.

The project was very much a team approach. Shelter provided contract administration, project management, and manufacturing direction and oversight at the Greensmart Manufacturing facility, operating together under the holding company Greensmart Shelters Inc.

This project was very unique. It had to meet superior LEED Silver Certified design standards, requiring top-level energy efficiency and conservation, with an extensive 50-year life span. LEED specifications covered ventilation, heating, lighting, insulation for R-value and noise suppression, fire protection and building materials. Greensmart’s Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) incorporated into the modular construction enabled the team to meet these stringent demands.

Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) are prefabricated building panels, constructed with expanded polystyrene rigid foam insulation, sandwiched between two oversized structural skins of oriented strand board, without the typical wood-studs that create heat loss. They are structurally superior to conventional wood frame buildings, enhancing the portability of these modular classrooms. And being tightly sealed and constructed indoors, this type of modular construction eliminates the potential for moulds and insects, providing a much healthier classroom environment.

Much more attractive, stronger, and comfortable than a typical portable, these new modular classrooms are in a class all their own. They feel like a site-built structure, yet they can be moved as school enrolments change.

“The end result of this project is energy-efficient schools that meet LEED Silver design requirements and provide a healthy environment through improved air quality and use of natural light,” says Jack Hayden, Minister of Infrastructure, Province of Alberta.

With decades of modular construction experience, Shelter also won a $30 million contract with BC’s Ministry of Education to provide 138 modular classrooms for their new full-day kindergarten. Construction is underway and all installations will be in place in time for the September 2011 school year.

“This is a great way to have gone,” says BC Minister of Education Margaret MacDiarmid. With enrolment growing in some areas and declining in others, modular classrooms provide the flexibility to be moved or clustered should enrolment forecasts change. Mary Polak, BC Minister of Children and Family Development, MLA and former School Board Chair, agrees, adding that modular buildings provide a ton of savings in time and labour. Buildings are constructed indoors, eliminating weather delays. Plus building construction can move ahead without waiting for foundations to be laid. This translates into a costs savings, which means more money can be put into the classroom.

“I am quite confident that [parents and educators] are going to be quite pleased to receive [these modular classrooms],” says Minister Polak. “These are different. You can just tell by the feel of it,” adds Minister MacDiarmid. Designed to last up to 40 years, these structures, installed on permanent foundations, will provide the same feel and comfort as any site-built structure. Even those buildings that will be installed on temporary foundations will provide the warmth necessary to deal with a harsh winter in the north and the comfort of air conditioning on a sweltering hot day in the south.

From the words of kindergarten students and their parents who visited the first classroom, these new modular classrooms are destined to be a winner. “It looks like a real classroom,” said parent Tracey Munday. Parent Sheri Williams agreed, “They look pretty amazing.”

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Shelter Wins MBI Award for Surrey College

LocationSurrey, BCProject TypeEducationalClientSurrey School District #36ArchitectGraham Hoffat Mathiessen Architects

Surrey School District #36 selected Shelter Industries to construct the first phase of the new Surrey College Campus, which houses a self-funded adult educational…

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Surrey School District #36 selected Shelter Industries to construct the first phase of the new Surrey College Campus, which houses a self-funded adult educational program run by the Surrey School District.

Kerry Magnus, the Associate Director, Business Management Services, at the Surrey School District, says “We decided to go with modular mainly because of time constraints. Since modular could be constructed indoors while the permanent foundations were laid, we could get up and running faster. It was amazing to see the crane put the modular units into place all in one day!”

The Surrey College Campus is a 17,071 square foot classroom complex, comprised of 32 modules. This permanent facility includes 12 classrooms, administrative offices, student and faculty lounges, and washrooms. The facility includes all the attributes of site-built construction, including a skylight, lots of functional windows, central hot water heating, electrical, communications and security systems, full fire alarm and sprinkler systems, ventilation system, window and door security shutters, and a permanent foundation with an insulated/heated crawl space.

Surrey School Associate Director Kerry Magnus also credits the architectural team for designing a building that looks so “collegiate” and inviting. “These modular buildings are certainly nothing like the old school portables. Some of our staff were very wary about going with modular. But now that the project is complete, everyone is very happy with it. These modular buildings have a completely different feel than what people imagine they would have.”

Project architect, Mark Mathiasen of Graham Hoffart Mathiasen Architects, says “We’ve worked extensively with modular construction. It’s easy to work with once one understands a few basic principals, including shipping constraints. Construction in a climate-controlled factory environment contributed to the high quality result.”

“The facility was completed and opened December 2006,” says Dave Paul, Director of Instruction at the Surrey College. “We are quite satisfied with the quality of construction in these buildings. They are warm and inviting. I particularly like the ventilation system. With the heat and fresh air, these are very comfortable and healthy buildings. I’m also very pleased with Shelter’s responsiveness to our needs. Overall, I’m very pleased. These modular units are top quality.”

“This building is representative of what you can do with modular,” says Shelter Industries president Harold Clifford. “With great design and superior quality construction, this project enabled Shelter to win an award from the Modular Building Institute.”

To learn more about the Surrey College, go to www.surreycollege.sd36.bc.ca.

Industrial

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Department of Defence

LocationEsquimalt, BCProject TypeIndustrialClientDepartment of Defence

Office Complex

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Office Complex

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Innergex and Harrison Hydro

LocationStave Lake, BCProject TypeIndustrialClientInnergex and Harrison Hydro

6 12X46 Single Dorm Units

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6 12X46 Single Dorm Units

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Northwest Fabricators

LocationFort McMurray, ABProject TypeIndustrialClientNorthwest Fabricators

In progress

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In progress

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3-storey Workforce Housing for Gold Mine Camp

Project Length5 weeksLocationNorthwest British ColumbiaProject TypeIndustrialClientHomestake Canada Inc. Eskay Creek Site

Shelter has supplied turnkey workforce housing for a mining camp located in an isolated section of northwestern British Columbia near Alaska. The three-storey dormitory…

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Shelter has supplied turnkey workforce housing for a mining camp located in an isolated section of northwestern British Columbia near Alaska. The three-storey dormitory complex was designed and built for Eskay Creek, an underground gold mine wholly owned and operated by Homestake Canada Inc. Eskay Creek is considered one of Canada’s most profitable mines.

“Traditionally, workforce camps have used one or two-storey designs. The Eskay Creek residence is a unique application of modular design and construction,” says Harold Clifford, Shelter Modular’s President.

Cold Weather Specifications

The mountainous site, approximately 1000 kilometers north of Vancouver, is accessible by truck along a 60-kilometer gravel road from the nearest highway.

Shelter designed and manufactured the modular building to meet cold-weather and heavy-snow specifications: some winters have up to 55 feet of snow. The truss roof, built in sections and finished in 26-gauge profiled metal, is a sharp 12/12 pitch. There is extra insulation, amounting to R40 in the roof and R20 in the walls. Heating is based on a combination of electricity, propane, and a glycol back up.

The dormitory-style building accommodates an additional 48 employees and features washroom and laundry facilities on each storey. The twelve large modules, or sections, built in Shelter’s Aldergrove factory, were craned onto a perimeter concrete foundation. Installation and commissioning on site took only about five weeks.

Workforce Camp Experience

The new addition is an expansion of existing residential facilities, and will serve for the life of the mine, an additional six or seven years. The housing complex can then be easily moved to another mine site.

Shelter management’s extensive experience in workforce housing dates from the 1960s. The company has produced camps for nearly every industry: oil and gas, mining, forestry, construction and pipelines. In addition, Shelter has produced a complete range of worksite buildings, such as kitchens and diners, washrooms, laundry rooms, dormitories and houses. Shelter buildings arrive with completely finished turnkey facilities.

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Shelter Camped Out in the Oilsands

LocationNorthern SaskatchewanProject TypeIndustrialClientOilsands QuestBudget$3.7 million

In a remote area of Northern Saskatchewan, Shelter modular units have become home to a 100-person workforce for Oilsands Quest Sask.Inc. In the dead…

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In a remote area of Northern Saskatchewan, Shelter modular units have become home to a 100-person workforce for Oilsands Quest Sask.Inc.

In the dead cold of winter, in temperatures as low as 45 degrees below zero, Shelter worked with Oilsands Quest to install this major project. The project involved a 23,000 square foot housing camp, constructed of 31 modules, including workforce housing, offices, and an 8-module kitchen-dining-recreational facility, including a 60-person dining area.

Oilsands Quest procurement manager, Gordon Weiland says, “The facility had to be installed during the winter months because the soft earth would make it impossible to navigate in any type of vehicle. We needed to find a modular company that had the experience and the capability to meet our major needs in a very short time. We looked at a variety of companies and finally chose Shelter because they have the experience, excellent product, and the ability be responsive to our unique needs.”

This new camp was created to replace an older, 35-person work camp on the same grounds. The old facilities had to be moved in order to install the new camp in the same site with the utilities and connections. However, since Oilsands’ exploration work had to continue during this time and people still had to be housed in the modular units, the installation team faced a massive challenge. Shelter’s team had to work day and night over the Christmas holidays and well into February to help move the older modular units and install all the new modular units. Some people even had to be housed in the new modular units before they were fully installed.

The whole project was completed by the end of February 2007. The entire $3.7 million housing camp includes two dormitory buildings: (1) one dormitory building has 49 single occupancy rooms with a common washroom, and (2) a second dormitory building includes 35 single occupancy rooms with a common washroom facility. This second building also includes 10 executive rooms with shared and private washroom configurations. The camp also includes a custom-designed office facility for base camp administration, and two 8-person sleepers and two well-site staff quarters for satellite camp use. The units were installed on steel skids to make them easy to relocate to future sites.

Oilsands Quest procurement manager, Gordon Weiland says, “We are very pleased with Shelter. This was an enormous undertaking. They bent over backwards to help us meet our timelines and their installation people were very responsive and helpful. One day, we even worked for 26 hours straight to haul the camp 23 kilometres! We couldn’t be more pleased!”

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Canadian Department of Fisheries and Canadian Coast Guard

LocationDenny Island, near Bella BellaProject TypeIndustrialClientCoast Guard and Fisheries station

Pre-fabricated building manufacturer, Shelter Modular, announces the official opening of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ new Coast Guard and Fisheries station…

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Pre-fabricated building manufacturer, Shelter Modular, announces the official opening of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ new Coast Guard and Fisheries station on Denny Island, near Bella Bella on BC’s central coast.

Shelter pre-fabricated this attractive new residential and office complex, consisting of one office, one duplex residence and two three-bedroom, single-family residences, providing more than 10,000 square feet in total. The complex is designed to serve as the permanent residence for four Fisheries Conservation and Protection officers and their families, and as an office for Fisheries and a rotating shift of four Coast Guard Search and Rescue officers.

New resident and Fisheries Conservation Officer Derek Chung says, “These new buildings are top quality. They are warm, comfortable, and well-designed with a number of attractive features like lots of windows, an extended veranda and wooden accents that make it feel like home. I would never have guessed that this was a modular-built home. It is much better than I expected. I’m very impressed!”

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans specified modular-built construction namely because it enabled them to overcome two main challenges: the short building season of BC’s tempestuous central coast climate and the remote location of the site. Choosing pre-fabricated buildings enabled them to start construction immediately while foundations were being laid. It also made logistics for coordinating trades, materials and inspections much more efficient, and therefore more economical. When the construction was complete, the completed sections were barged to the site for final assembly.

Fisheries Project Manager, Gregg Morris, P. Eng., says, “Working on this project has changed my perception of pre-fabricated buildings. I used to think that a modular building was an ‘enhanced trailer.’ This project has convinced me otherwise. With the building being constructed indoors, I am convinced that the quality of pre-fabricated buildings is in fact far superior to on-site construction, particularly in a remote area. And with the help of an architect who was experienced with modular construction, we were able to create attractive buildings that rival any site-built structures.”

“You can do a lot more with modular construction than most people think,” says project architect Bill Evans of Russher & Evans Architects. “Of course, we have to design with shipping considerations in mind, but with some creative design we can construct some very attractive buildings.”

“Modular construction is ideal for remote locations that don’t have immediate access to trades and materials,” says Shelters President Harold Clifford. “It is also ideal for repetitive design applications, such as in schools and motels; and for stores, offices and workforce housing since they can be relocated and reused when needs or market conditions change. With creative design and versatile applications, modular construction can be a more feasible option.”

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Russian Artic Workforce Camp

LocationRussia, Artic CircleProject TypeIndustrialClientJSC Omsukchansk Mining Company

At 70 degrees below 0 Celsius, survival means simply keeping warm and dry. That’s the case with a gold mining camp built for northeastern Russian by Shelter. …

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At 70 degrees below 0 Celsius, survival means simply keeping warm and dry. That’s the case with a gold mining camp built for northeastern Russian by Shelter.

“The camp is designed for Artic weather conditions,” says Nigel Harrison of Shelter. “In the winter, when the camp was delivered and installed, night-time temperatures dipped to between -60 and -70 degrees.”

Greatly Reduced Frieght Costs

To eliminate substantial ocean freight charges from Vancouver to Russia, the modular camp was constructed at Shelter’s factory near Beijing, China. The camp was then shipped by freighter from China to Russia, greatly reducing costs.

The manager responsible for camp procurement says that he saved about $320,000 in ocean freight costs by shipping the project from the China factory. “It’s a good camp,” he adds, “that amply meets our needs.”

Relocatable Mine Camp

The hard rock underground mine, on the Julietta property about 400 kilometers north of Magadan, is a partnership between a Canadian and a Russian mining company, JSC Omsukchansk. The mine poured its first gold in October 2001 and is expected to last up to ten years, after which the camp can be moved to another site.

Complete Artic Community

The 22,000 square-foot camp is a complete community, housing 136 employees. In addition to bedrooms, the camp includes lounge and recreation areas, full kitchen and dining facilities, and laundry. There is also a 16-foot wide, 212-foot long interconnecting structure serving as a recreational facility and indoor Artic Corridor. Twenty-seven separate modules and numerous pre-fabricated panels make up the camp.

While the project was designed in Canada, it combines building materials sourced from both China and Canada. Canadian supplies include catering equipment and furnaces. Shelter camps can be designed to suit a variety of budget options.

China Production Facility

With its large factory in China, Shelter is the only Western company to have modular-building production facilities in Pacific Asia. Shelter offers the benefits of a North America team, including design, engineering and management, coupled with production in the China factory for lower final costs and greatly reduced transport costs. All projects are designed and constructed with the same quality standards, materials and supervision as in Canada.

Multi-Family

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Pemberton’s Mountain Trails Townhomes

Project Length6 monthsLocationPemberton, BCProject TypeMulti-FamilyClientPemberton Townhomes Ltd.

Imagine five two-storey buildings, containing 46 residential townhomes, being constructed and completed in less than six months — start to finish! Now imagine these…

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Imagine five two-storey buildings, containing 46 residential townhomes, being constructed and completed in less than six months — start to finish! Now imagine these same townhomes being constructed in Aldergrove and transported to Pemberton, BC for on-site assembly and finishing. That’s the reality behind the beautiful Mountain Trails Townhomes in Pemberton, located 2 minutes north of Whistler.

Construction management for this project was supplied by Pacific Building Systems, which is a Canadian Project Management Company with an exceptional track record for effectively combining factory-built and onsite construction methods. Pacific Building Systems Inc. assisted Pemberton Townhomes Ltd. in the development of the project, along with architects and engineers who worked with Shelter to detail and factory-build the wood-frame building modules.

The entire living space was factory-built in Shelter’s Aldergrove plant and transported to the site, where all 70 separately-build modules were craned onto the foundation and finished. The 46-unit townhome project is the first factory-built residential project in Pemberton.

Factory Construction: An Easy Choice

So why factory-build a residential project of this size? Sid Landolt of Pemberton Townhomes, owner of the Mountain Trails Townhomes Complex says, “When you’re building in a small town, costs can quickly increase due to having less access to materials and labour. Our Strategy was to use the local community for a portion of the work and off-site modular manufacture to minimize our risk. The method is especially effective when you’re on a tight deadline — it’s fast, efficient and allows you to complete your project ahead of competitors.” Mike Salter of Pacific Building Systems adds,“Factory construction probably saved us about 2.5 months compared to on-site construction.”

Dave Sharpe of Shelter reports that, “Each factory-built townhouse component was built in the climate-controlled factory by a team of 80 trades people working two shifts a day. Indoor construction meant that no days were lost due to bad weather and kiln-dried lumber stayed dry throughout the project. Consistent quality as well as speed of construction, without additional cost, are added advantages to factory construction. After factory construction, the modules were delivered to the site complete with all electrical, plumbing kitchen and bathroom cabinets, and interior trim in place — ready for final paint and floor coverings.”

Factory construction started at one end of the factory with the assembly of floors and walls. The entire module was then moved forward to receive insulation, windows, doors, and interior finishes. Even wood burning fireplaces were factory-installed.

Principals Jamie Cooke, Susan Carey and Mike Salter of Pacific Buildings Systems Inc. teamed up to coordinate and supervise the critical task of assembling the modules on-site where roofs, siding and decks were all completed.

Jamie Cooke adds, “The townhomes have the advantage of having a double-sealed roof system. Unlike on-site construction, off-site construction means there’s no settling due to drying wood, since the wood never got wet in the first place. That means no shrinkage, no settling, and none of the usual problems associated with outdoor construction. Instead, construction is completed indoors, where quality-control inspectors and other professionals such as architects, engineers and building inspectors can monitor each stage of the work. There’s even a second series of building inspections made when the factory-built components are assembled and completed on-site.”

Sid Landolt, Pemberton Townhomes Ltd. adds, “I would definitely go this route again. This construction system evokes quality and minimizes financial surprises. Modular construction means you never have to build with weather-damaged building components, since electricians, plumbers, and other trades people work in ideal indoor conditions. Nothing is exposed to the elements before its time.”

Gord McLeod of Windermere Sea to Sky Real Estate calls it the $100,000 drive. “We sold great homes at affordable prices. Just by driving north from Whistler for 25 minutes, buyers saved $100,000 for comparable Whistler Properties. As a result we called it the $100,000 drive.”

Skeptics Pleasantly Surprised

Nigel Harrison of Shelter seems to take all the accolades this project has generated in stride. “As long as I can remember, factory-built residential communities like this have pleasantly surprised the skeptics. It’s the most cost-efficient way to create a residential community that is attractive, both on the inside and the outside, while at the same time providing the owners with dependable start-to-finish quality. This project has combined traditional tried and true technologies with state-of the-art manufactured housing technologies to produce residential townhomes that will stand the test of time and provide living environment that will be owned the way they were built — with pride.”

First Nations

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Esketem’c First Nation

LocationWilliams Lake, BCProject TypeFirst NationsClientEsketem’c First Nation

60X60 Office Complex

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60X60 Office Complex

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IRCA Group Presentation Center

LocationSqaumish, BCProject TypeFirst NationsClientIRCA Group

In progress

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In progress

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School and Health Center

LocationHaida Gwaii, BCProject TypeFirst NationsClientSD 50

In progress

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In progress

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Shelter builds school for remote First Nations community at Kluskus Lake

Project Length21 DaysLocationKluskus village, ChilcotinProject TypeFirst NationsClientKluskus Indian Band

How does a school get built at an isolated site with no road access? For Shelter Modular, the answer is easy, build the structure in its factory and lift it to the site…

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How does a school get built at an isolated site with no road access? For Shelter Modular, the answer is easy, build the structure in its factory and lift it to the site by helicopter. Shelter supplied the school and community hall to the Kluskus Indian Band.

“Designing and providing the facility was very much a team approach,” said Nigel Harrison. We worked with the Carrier-Chilcotin Tribal Council, of which Kluskus is a member. The attractive school was designed to blend in with a community in which most structures are log cabins.

There was a short time frame to provide a new school said Harrison… site installation was completed in 21 days. The 5,000 sq. ft. modular school was supplied to the isolated Kluskus village, which is located in the Chilcotin region approximately 120 kilometers west of Quesnel. The challenge was to airlift by helicopter, 19 building modules, five raised roof sections and six loads of material to the Kluskus village from a marshalling area 5 miles from the village. A crew of building trade specialists were flown to the site via float plane from Quesnel. Scheduling of crews and equipment as well as working with weather conditions were some of the challenges facing Shelter.

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Shelter builds First Nations T’it’kit Preschool

LocationLillooet, BCProject TypeFirst NationsClientT’it’kit preschool

“The last thing you’d think, looking around the big cheerful space, is that you have entered a portable or modular building,” says T’it’kit representative…

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“The last thing you’d think, looking around the big cheerful space, is that you have entered a portable or modular building,” says T’it’kit representative about the new pre-school manufactured by Shelter “The T’it’kit preschool represents a new class of modular construction.” The walls are well insulated, the rooms are well ventilated and the design is functional elegant. And compared to conventional construction methods, this modular is considerably less expensive.”

Architect Ib Hansen also praised the community for its members hard work. “This was a special project for us,” he said. “It may well be small in footprint but involved lots of time in our office too. We wanted to realize the cost benefits without losing the building’s individuality, he said. We saw a real result when we put this building up for public tender.”

“We have not sacrificed on the finishing work and the building is extremely well insulated. Shelter delivered a quality product.”